Publications

Secessionist social services reduce the public costs of civilian killings: Experimental evidence from the United States and the United Kingdom

How do international audiences evaluate the legitimacy of secessionist insurgencies? Although secessionists often propagate their behavioral choices, such as state-building and non-violence, to international audiences in the hopes of generating support, scholars know little about the effects of this information...

Explaining opposition to refugee resettlement: The role of NIMBYism and perceived threats

One week after President Donald Trump signed a controversial executive order to reduce the influx of refugees to the United States, we conducted a survey experiment to understand American citizens’ attitudes toward refugee resettlement. Specifically, we evaluated whether citizens consider the geographic context of the resettlement program...

Misinformation and the Justification of Socially Undesirable Preferences

Attempts to correct political misperceptions often fail. The dominant theoretical explanation for this failure comes from psychological research on motivated reasoning. We identify a novel source of motivated reasoning in response to corrective information: the justification of socially undesirable preferences.

Donostia – San Sebastían: A City in Search of Talent and Innovation

The case describes the story of a city, Donostia-San Sebastián, which has the political and institutional goal to become a city of innovation and entrepreneurship.To achieve this, there are different dilemmas related to the size of the city, the shortage of talent in certain specialties, cannibalization of talent...

The Quality-Acces Tradeoff in Decentralizing Public Services: Evidence from Education in the OECD and Spain

Decentralized delivery of public services should enhance constituents’ ability to hold politicians accountable and improve public service outcomes, according to theory. Yet, decentralization has not consistently yielded those improvements.

LATIN AMERICA LOSES ITS GROWTH POTENTIAL

We recently talked about the theory of economic complexity, and disclosed some revealing data about the economic complexity of Spain. We would like to continue this series by focusing on the countries of Ibero-America. Specifically, we will analyze the extent to which their productive capabilities have evolved in recent years.

THE 2030 AGENDA WAS MADE FOR US

“We’ve already met most of the goals. Besides, this agenda wasn’t made for us.” We hear these words too often coming from international representatives when they’re asked about the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, established in the 2030 Agenda. In most cases, this response shows a failure to grasp the fact that in 2015...

CAPACITY AND DIVERSITY: YOU WON’T GET AHEAD BY FOLLOWING THE CROWD

Tell me what you can do and I’ll tell you what you're worth." While this sentence may come across as vague at first glance—something we could easily hear in a job interview or in the context of US doctorates—it can actually be applied as a tool to predict the economic growth of an area, region or country.

The Local Geography of Transnational Terrorism

Why are some locations more attractive targets for transnational terrorism than oth-ers? Remarkably little is known about the local-level conditions and attributes that determine precisely where transnational terror attacks occur within targeted countries.To date, quantitative terrorism research identi es country- or region-level correlates of terrorism,...

Do Foreign Aid Projects Attract Transnational Terrorism?

Governments and NGOs establish aid projects in order to improve the quality of life for local residents around the world. While recent news stories about aid workers being kidnapped or killed by terrorist groups are alarming, they mask a broader question: Are aid projects elective in promoting humanitarian aims and pacifying the areas to which it is sent?...

YOU DON’T STOP BEING POOR WHEN YOU EARN OVER 1.90 DOLLARS A DAY

736 million people in the world are living below the extreme poverty threshold.” This was the official figure for global poverty published by the World Bank in 2015. However, on the 20th of September this year, the United Nations and Oxford University increased this multidimensional figure to 1.3 billion.