GLOBAL HUMANITIES AND CRITICAL THINKING

This track covers all major Humanities disciplines with an innovative, two-fold approach: Firstly, it provides a reflection on the specific transferable skills the Humanities bring into today’s world; Secondly, it incorporates experiential learning methodologies such as workshops and on-site experiences to enhance the learning outcome. Students will reflect on Art, Literature, History, and Philosophy to develop the analytical and critical thinking skills needed to make sense of today’s complex world and gain a comprehensive overview of individuals as humans, citizens and professionals.

THE NATURAL WORLD IN A MODERN CITY

REGINA LLAMAS

This workshop will explore the fundamental ways in which cities have changed our relationship with nature. Students will look at the city of Madrid and explore three areas where city, nature and society have successfully integrated. Participants will study the history of public parks, the development and purpose of the greener areas of Madrid (outside public parks) and the creation of urban movements engaged in creating a biodiverse environment: how they came to be, their philosophical underpinnings and their benefits to a modern city.

THINK ART

CARMEN VAN BRUGGEN

In this course, participants will learn how to use art for critical reflection in their own professional fields. Firstly, it explores the relation between art and critical thinking: Can criticism be found beyond explicitly critical expressions in art?
Secondly, students will evaluate a selection of artworks and analyze their critical potential for professional fields. Participants will be encouraged to make connections with their own field of expertise.

WHAT IS POWER? WHAT IS LEADERSHIP?

DAVID MOSHFEGH

In this course, students will study power and the exercise of power. What it actually means to hold power, who has it, how one achieves it and, more elusive, how one holds on to it, are some of the most complex questions of human social and cultural history. The class content is focused on three of the most important visions, from the Renaissance to the present, of what constitutes power and what it means to be a leader. As the divergent visions of power refer and correspond to one another, students will evaluate if they are relevant today and whether the meaning of power and leadership is static or changing in our own time. Hence, participants are ultimately asked to think through what kind of leaders they are and want to be.

URBAN CRISIS-NATURES’S UTOPIA

ALBA SANCHIS

This workshop will explore the country-city dichotomy through several Spanish texts from the 20th century (both cinematic and literary). These texts will support the several approaches to ideas about the city and the country, from the point of view of the construction of the subject. In Spanish contemporary cinema and literature, the village, the country and nature have long been portrayed as protective, timeless spaces aside from the time-space compression which have characterized the rise of globalization. Contemporary portrayals of the country are frequent in Spanish culture, and most of them do so as a response to the subject’s identity crisis, the latter being rooted in the urban.

“MOVIDA, TRANSICIÓN AND DESENCANTO”: A TOUR OF THE MADRID’S UNDERGROUND CULTURE

DAVID ÁLVAREZ

During this session, students will visit one of the epicenters of a social phenomenon in Madrid: Malasaña. The end of the 1970s was one of the most important moments of the recent Spanish History: after 40 years of dictatorship, young Spaniards were eager to escape from their reality and feed on everything that had been censored until then. Students will discuss the importance of music and art in the configuration of this movement, the gender stereotypes and sexual orientation challenge of figures such as Pedro Almodóvar or Fabio MacNamara, and the emergence and leadership of new female icons such as Alaska or Ana Curra.

THE CITY AS A CLASSROOM: THE ORIGINS OF MADRID

MIGUEL LARRAÑAGA

The main objective of this course is to know the origins of the city of Madrid by discovering the most prominent places. It begins by visualizing the city´s physical space, its foundation, its frontier position, the Christian occupation, and the way of life of its inhabitants. Furthermore, it explores the city´s urban development and the history behind the streets. The class covers the start of the 9th century, during the appearance of the first center of the Islamic population, to the end of the Middle Ages in the 15th century.

BARRIO DE LAS LETRAS TOUR

GORETTI GONZÁLEZ

In this on-site experience, students will explore the emblematic Barrio de las Letras; the city´s literary and intellectual center. A vibrant quarter that housed the writers, painters, and actors of Spain’s Golden Age and still showcases both classical and modern plays. It is home to the newly reopened printing press where Don Quixote was first published in 1605 and the Trinitarian church where Cervantes is thought to be buried. In Plaza Santa Ana, at a former convent razed during the French occupation, students can have a coffee at Hemingway’s favorite bar.

THE STORIES WE TELL

ROBERT MINGHALL

In this seminar, participants will understand and learn to apply the principles of a narrative to their own professional fields. A narrative is the universal human currency; it’s how human cultures explain their world. But whilst telling stories is something we all instinctively do, the conscious application of the principles of narrative is largely confined to the art of advertising. Its scope is so much broader, and this seminar will encourage and equip participants to apply these principles within a wider array of professional contexts.

GLOBAL ETHICAL ISSUES

FERNANDO DAMETO

In this seminar students will explore the impact of Globalization and the Digital Revolution in our societies. The class will explore the events that developed into the so-called fourth industrial revolution and the impact this phenomenon provoked worldwide. Once students are aware of the origin, the class will analyze the social consequences of this multipolar world in which inequality (economically, educationally, socially, etc.) is growing fast.

CULTURE MEETS TECHNOLOGY: INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL HUMANITIES WORKSHOP

MARÍA JOSÉ FERRARI

This course focuses on the two-faced relationship between culture and technology: On the one hand, it sheds light on the way Philosophy, History and Cultural Studies offer valuable insights to the major cultural and social changes that we are facing as a result of the digital revolution; on the other hand, it explores the way technologies have transformed how we create, share and consume culture today. Students will examine how the digital transformation is affecting our identities, cultures and societies and will work on digital social projects to understand the possibilities that technology brings to the Humanities.

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